Water safety

The Water Safety Code consists of four simple rules to remember each time you venture near the water.

“Buddy up!”

That’s what swimming instructors say. Always swim with a partner, every time — whether you’re swimming in a backyard pool or in a lake. Even experienced swimmers can become tired or get muscle cramps, which might make it difficult to get out of the water. When people swim together, they can help each other or go for help in case of an emergency.


Get skilled.

Speaking of emergencies, it’s good to be prepared. Learning some life-saving skills, such as CPR and rescue techniques, can help you save a life.

Attention, yearly we organize First Aid training for our students.

This year the studying will be carried out by Swedish Red Cross.

If you our ex. student, please, welcome.

We cover all the fees, because we really understand the importance of these skills.

Please, write us if you are interested.

The course will be 31th of January .

18:00 – 21:15

Scandic hotel,  Näsbyvägen 4, 183 30 Täby

Fika is included!


Know your limits.

Swimming can be a lot of fun — and you might want to stay in the water as long as possible. If you’re not a good swimmer or you’re just learning to swim, don’t go in water that’s so deep you can’t touch the bottom and don’t try to keep up with skilled swimmers. That can be hard, especially when your friends are challenging you — but it’s a pretty sure bet they’d rather have you safe and alive.

If you are a good swimmer and have had lessons, keep an eye on friends who aren’t as comfortable or as skilled as you are. If it seems like they (or you) are getting tired or a little uneasy, suggest that you take a break from swimming for a while.



Swim in safe areas only.

It’s a good idea to swim only in places that are supervised by a lifeguard. No one can anticipate changing ocean currents, rip currents, sudden storms, or other hidden dangers. In the event that something does go wrong, lifeguards are trained in rescue techniques.

Swimming in an open body of water (like a river, lake, or ocean) is different from swimming in a pool. You need more energy to handle the currents and other changing conditions in the open water.

If you do find yourself caught in a current, don’t panic and don’t fight the current. Try to swim parallel to the shore until you are able to get out of the current, which is usually a narrow channel of water. Gradually try to make your way back to shore as you do so. If you’re unable to swim away from the current, stay calm and float with the current. The current will usually slow down, then you can swim to shore.

Take care and enjoy swimming wisely!

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